yahoonewsphotos:

Journalist James Foley
Journalist James Foley, captured and held six weeks while covering the uprising in Libya, knew the risks when he went to Syria in 2012 to cover the escalating violence there. It didn’t matter. He was a journalist at heart, once saying he’d cover local news if it meant doing the job he loved.
Foley was snatched again in Syria in November 2012 when the car he was riding in was stopped by four militants in a battle zone that Sunni rebel fighters and government forces were trying to control. A video posted Tuesday purportedly showed his execution, but officials in Washington were still working to verify its authenticity. (AP)
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yahoonewsphotos:

Journalist James Foley
Journalist James Foley, captured and held six weeks while covering the uprising in Libya, knew the risks when he went to Syria in 2012 to cover the escalating violence there. It didn’t matter. He was a journalist at heart, once saying he’d cover local news if it meant doing the job he loved.
Foley was snatched again in Syria in November 2012 when the car he was riding in was stopped by four militants in a battle zone that Sunni rebel fighters and government forces were trying to control. A video posted Tuesday purportedly showed his execution, but officials in Washington were still working to verify its authenticity. (AP)
Find more news related pictures on our photo galleries page.
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yahoonewsphotos:

Journalist James Foley
Journalist James Foley, captured and held six weeks while covering the uprising in Libya, knew the risks when he went to Syria in 2012 to cover the escalating violence there. It didn’t matter. He was a journalist at heart, once saying he’d cover local news if it meant doing the job he loved.
Foley was snatched again in Syria in November 2012 when the car he was riding in was stopped by four militants in a battle zone that Sunni rebel fighters and government forces were trying to control. A video posted Tuesday purportedly showed his execution, but officials in Washington were still working to verify its authenticity. (AP)
Find more news related pictures on our photo galleries page.
Zoom Info

yahoonewsphotos:

Journalist James Foley

Journalist James Foley, captured and held six weeks while covering the uprising in Libya, knew the risks when he went to Syria in 2012 to cover the escalating violence there. It didn’t matter. He was a journalist at heart, once saying he’d cover local news if it meant doing the job he loved.

Foley was snatched again in Syria in November 2012 when the car he was riding in was stopped by four militants in a battle zone that Sunni rebel fighters and government forces were trying to control. A video posted Tuesday purportedly showed his execution, but officials in Washington were still working to verify its authenticity. (AP)

Find more news related pictures on our photo galleries page.

If genuine, we are appalled by the brutal murder of an innocent American journalist and we express our deepest condolences to his family and friends.

National Security Council spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden • Discussing the video purportedly showing photojournalist James Foley being killed at the hands of ISIS, reported as retaliation for U.S. airstrikes on Iraq. Though it’s not confirmed, Foley has been missing for nearly two years, reportedly kidnapped while on the ground in Syria. Our policy on the video follows perzadook's: We ain't linking to it. (via shortformblog)

chicagotribune:

He was an extraordinary son, brother, journalist and person
The mother of American journalist James Foley, who was purportedly beheaded by Islamic militants, said on Tuesday her son gave his life to expose the suffering of the Syrian people and she asked his kidnappers to release their other captives.
"He was an extraordinary son, brother, journalist and person," Diane Foley said in a post on a Facebook page set up by the Foley family.
"We implore the kidnappers to spare the lives of the remaining hostages. Like Jim, they are innocents. They have no control over American government policy in Iraq, Syria or anywhere in the world," Diane Foley said in the statement.
Foley was a graduate of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism.
"Journalists face threats in many forms as they try to report difficult stories that need to be told, but the attack on Jim was barbaric," Northwestern said in a statement. "It was, in a larger sense, an attack on freedoms necessary in a civilized society and across strained cultures. Jim endures for us as a beacon reminding us of the risks implicit in shedding light where inhumanity can take hold."
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chicagotribune:

He was an extraordinary son, brother, journalist and person
The mother of American journalist James Foley, who was purportedly beheaded by Islamic militants, said on Tuesday her son gave his life to expose the suffering of the Syrian people and she asked his kidnappers to release their other captives.
"He was an extraordinary son, brother, journalist and person," Diane Foley said in a post on a Facebook page set up by the Foley family.
"We implore the kidnappers to spare the lives of the remaining hostages. Like Jim, they are innocents. They have no control over American government policy in Iraq, Syria or anywhere in the world," Diane Foley said in the statement.
Foley was a graduate of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism.
"Journalists face threats in many forms as they try to report difficult stories that need to be told, but the attack on Jim was barbaric," Northwestern said in a statement. "It was, in a larger sense, an attack on freedoms necessary in a civilized society and across strained cultures. Jim endures for us as a beacon reminding us of the risks implicit in shedding light where inhumanity can take hold."
Zoom Info
chicagotribune:

He was an extraordinary son, brother, journalist and person
The mother of American journalist James Foley, who was purportedly beheaded by Islamic militants, said on Tuesday her son gave his life to expose the suffering of the Syrian people and she asked his kidnappers to release their other captives.
"He was an extraordinary son, brother, journalist and person," Diane Foley said in a post on a Facebook page set up by the Foley family.
"We implore the kidnappers to spare the lives of the remaining hostages. Like Jim, they are innocents. They have no control over American government policy in Iraq, Syria or anywhere in the world," Diane Foley said in the statement.
Foley was a graduate of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism.
"Journalists face threats in many forms as they try to report difficult stories that need to be told, but the attack on Jim was barbaric," Northwestern said in a statement. "It was, in a larger sense, an attack on freedoms necessary in a civilized society and across strained cultures. Jim endures for us as a beacon reminding us of the risks implicit in shedding light where inhumanity can take hold."
Zoom Info
chicagotribune:

He was an extraordinary son, brother, journalist and person
The mother of American journalist James Foley, who was purportedly beheaded by Islamic militants, said on Tuesday her son gave his life to expose the suffering of the Syrian people and she asked his kidnappers to release their other captives.
"He was an extraordinary son, brother, journalist and person," Diane Foley said in a post on a Facebook page set up by the Foley family.
"We implore the kidnappers to spare the lives of the remaining hostages. Like Jim, they are innocents. They have no control over American government policy in Iraq, Syria or anywhere in the world," Diane Foley said in the statement.
Foley was a graduate of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism.
"Journalists face threats in many forms as they try to report difficult stories that need to be told, but the attack on Jim was barbaric," Northwestern said in a statement. "It was, in a larger sense, an attack on freedoms necessary in a civilized society and across strained cultures. Jim endures for us as a beacon reminding us of the risks implicit in shedding light where inhumanity can take hold."
Zoom Info
chicagotribune:

He was an extraordinary son, brother, journalist and person
The mother of American journalist James Foley, who was purportedly beheaded by Islamic militants, said on Tuesday her son gave his life to expose the suffering of the Syrian people and she asked his kidnappers to release their other captives.
"He was an extraordinary son, brother, journalist and person," Diane Foley said in a post on a Facebook page set up by the Foley family.
"We implore the kidnappers to spare the lives of the remaining hostages. Like Jim, they are innocents. They have no control over American government policy in Iraq, Syria or anywhere in the world," Diane Foley said in the statement.
Foley was a graduate of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism.
"Journalists face threats in many forms as they try to report difficult stories that need to be told, but the attack on Jim was barbaric," Northwestern said in a statement. "It was, in a larger sense, an attack on freedoms necessary in a civilized society and across strained cultures. Jim endures for us as a beacon reminding us of the risks implicit in shedding light where inhumanity can take hold."
Zoom Info

chicagotribune:

He was an extraordinary son, brother, journalist and person

The mother of American journalist James Foley, who was purportedly beheaded by Islamic militants, said on Tuesday her son gave his life to expose the suffering of the Syrian people and she asked his kidnappers to release their other captives.

"He was an extraordinary son, brother, journalist and person," Diane Foley said in a post on a Facebook page set up by the Foley family.

"We implore the kidnappers to spare the lives of the remaining hostages. Like Jim, they are innocents. They have no control over American government policy in Iraq, Syria or anywhere in the world," Diane Foley said in the statement.

Foley was a graduate of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism.

"Journalists face threats in many forms as they try to report difficult stories that need to be told, but the attack on Jim was barbaric," Northwestern said in a statement. "It was, in a larger sense, an attack on freedoms necessary in a civilized society and across strained cultures. Jim endures for us as a beacon reminding us of the risks implicit in shedding light where inhumanity can take hold."